2.4.b: Decrease number of speed related fatalities from 169 in 2011 to 123 in 2017

Data Source: Fatality Analysis Reporting System (FARS) from the WA Traffic Safety Commission (WTSC).

Why is this important?

Speeding is the second-most common behavioral factor contributing to fatal collisions. From 2011-2013, speeding was involved in nearly 40% of fatalities.

What is being done?

High visibility enforcement campaigns, such as "Slow Down or Pay Up," are effective in changing and maintaining safe driving behavior. These emphasis patrols are conducted in areas identified as having a high number of speed related collisions.

Action Plan

What are the results?

Speeding involved fatalities 2011-2013 declined 15% compared to 2008-2010. Although the decline is very promising, much work remains to be done. We are continuing with high visibility enforcement campaigns, automated speed enforcement, education, and engineering calming techniques to reduce speeds and speed related crashes.

Ongoing Action Plan

Related Indicator: Target Zero Plan

Fact for Speeding Involved Fatalities:

  • Speeding is the second-most common behavioral factor contributing to fatal collisions.
  • Speeding was involved in nearly 40% of fatalities 2009-2011.
  • The risk of death and injury increases substantially as collision speed increases.
  • From 2009-2011, speeding-involved fatalities and serious injuries declined slightly faster than overall statewide fatalities.

Reported by: Washington Traffic Safety Commission and Washington State Patrol